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JEAN-PAUL BATH
Executive Director of VIA

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VIA Design 2009

VIA was formed by the French furniture manufacturers and the ministry of Industry in order to promote and contribute to innovation in the field of the “living space”. In this context, innovation is considered in all its different forms.
First of all we address sociological issues which touch on human behavior, be this individual or collective. This consists in the consideration of factors which contribute to the evolution of our society and which have an influence on the adaptation of existing products or the conception of those of the future. The furnishings and objects which compose our environment are thus considered as natural companions to our gestures and movements.
New materials and technologies, be this artisanal or industrial, constitute the second basis of innovation. Let us note that, since the beginning of the industrial era, progress in these domains has always opened the way to the development of new fields of creation.
Lastly, the cultural factors of a period are a source of innovation in that they generate the trends, give meaning and define a precise moment in time in the historical continuum of design.
It is on this basis that VIA seeks to discover the talented young designers of today. The selection of projects supported by VIA is the expression of this ambition as they are chosen on the basis of fundamental design elements: conceptual pertinence, technological innovativeness, exemplarity of social/environmental approach, originality of aesthetics and industrial feasibility. Once the projects are chosen, VIA finances the prototyping with the support of the CODIFA, the FCBA and the various CRITT Île-de-France.
Beyond this, VIA accompanies the designer in the development of his project and puts him/her in contact with manufacturers, editors or distributors who may be interested. In this way the VIA “Project Assistance Grants”, which are awarded to students in design schools and young professionals, are an important resource for the discovery of tomorrow’s talents. Since its creation twenty nine years ago, VIA has financed 427 projects and awarded 64 research grants.

VIA Carte Blanche Grant "De-territorialised milieus" by Philippe Rahm

"De-territorialised milieus"
The living space of contemporary people today is clearly confronted to an upheaval if not a complete turnabout in the traditional ordering of its categories and balances: between inside and outside, artificial and natural, enclosed and open. The “natural” as opposed to the “artificial” (insofar as the term “natural” qualifies that part of the real world that has not been modified by humankind), literally no longer exists. As a result of technical progress and population growth, and of swift industrial development after the middle of the 19th century, today the planet Earth itself, its atmosphere and its surface strata, have been transformed into artifices by human activity, as witness the phenomena of pollution and global warming. The German philosopher Martin Heidegger saw the origin of these phenomena in the project of modern technique, which proceeded by what he termed “provocation” or “critical ordering”, that is to say by subjecting nature to reason, taming it. If, prior to this, nature had neither objective nor duty, the aim of modern technique was to impose on nature a single vocation, an unequivocal use, a single use, thus depriving it of its non-determination, open-endedness and irrationality. Technique is the instrument of this transformation of the natural into the artificial. And architecture is part of the process, since its aim is to extract climate and geography from their space/time state of nature to make them domestic and reasonable.

Ideally, we may argue that at one time there was a clearcut and simple dichotomy between the interior of the house, its
architecture and the city around it (artificial space), and the exterior of the house, its environment and atmosphere (natural space). In the interior, architecture had created a technically controlled space in which an artificial climate and reconfigured geography held sway, making conditions more smooth, more convenient, more comfortable and more temperate all year round. Homes were thus settings for domestic geologies and humanist weather conditions, places of symmetry, balance and homogeneity. Outside, the environment was the domain of natural climate and primitive geography, unpredictable and intemperate, wild as forest or mountain, wind, cold and rain: assymetrical, unbalanced, heterogeneous. But this dichotomy no longer exists today. Change began at the local level with agricultural exploitation and urban pollution, before spreading worldwide, to the scale of the entire planet, with the present-day phenomenon of global warming. It is not a figure of speech to say that the whole world and its climates have become products of human activity today: although we may heat and cool only the interiors of our houses, it is the exteriors of our houses, meaning climates all over the Earth, that are rising by measurable degrees, due to the phenomenon of global warming. Time was when the external environment, the terrestrial atmosphere and the countryside, belonged to the realm of the natural, but from now on they too are in the category of the artificial.

Domestic geology, interior weather
The reaction to climate change today is to implement a policy known as “sustainable development”. In the construction
industry, this policy translates into fairly basic technical solutions, foremost among which is the reduction of energy used for heating and cooling. Remedial techniques put into play rely mainly on improving the building”s thermal insulation, ensuring good weatherproofing, and providing for the renewal and evacuation of air flow. Ironically, these measures conspire to produce an interior environment that is even more removed from the exterior than was previously the case, precluding all direct sense relationship with the external local context, other than that of a comprehensive interface: insulated, separated, controlled. This is a paradox: the technical measures put forward by architecture to achieve sustainable development accentuate the modern-day break between external environment and interior environment.
Our living space has been upended by these transformations of hierarchy in the dialectical rapport between natural and artificial, exterior and interior. If the external environment, beyond architecture, is no longer natural, might we
not put forward the hypothesis of a “naturalization” of interior space? Might not the interior environment of buildings be reconfigured in the name of sustainable development, not only as the locale of artifice but also as that of nature, that is to say of what is asymmetrical, unbalanced and heterogeneous? A second nature that ensures a domestic geology and an interior meteorology.
If nature, which by definition has always been excluded from the interior of habitat, is now also expelled from the exterior of habitat, might we not imagine a turning about of this situation, by reintroducing nature into the interior, by making the interior of a building more natural than the exterior, which it no longer is? This implies another upending of scale, hierarchy and classification: things which once belonged to the macrocosmic, to the realm of asymmetry, to the exterior of the habitat, to the natural and atmospheric worlds, suddenly find themselves inside the house, at microcosmic scale. Nature is no longer outside the house but inside.
To a certain extent, this upending was already latent in the 19th century, just as it was at work in the programme of
modernity, while remaining an involuntary consequence of it. An example is the drinking water of Paris, half of which today still comes from the Seine, but only after having been filtered and purified, which means that it is ultimately cleaner and more natural in our water pipes than it is in the river, polluted as the latter is. The turnabout is there. The interior of houses becomes, on the microcosmic scale, that of water in supply pipes: the place where the resurgence of the natural, the geological and the non-polluted
comes about. Inversely, the exterior, on the macrocosmic scale, that of the water in the river, becomes the domain of pollution, of the artificial, the accidental and unwanted by-product of human activity. From Gallo-Roman times to the middle of the 19th century, people in Paris drank water drawn from the Seine, which remained clean, natural and drinkable. The pollution of the river rose sharply in the course of the 19th century, in phase with urban development, a tragic turning point being the cholera epidemic of 1832, following which the authorities sought to implement strict control of water supply and drainage, as implemented by the prefect Haussmann after 1853. Subsequently, and up until 1901, the drinking water of Paris no longer came from the river but from the countless natural springs of the Parisian basin, the water of which was brought to the city in sealed aqueducts. Not until 1901, with the construction at Ivry-sur-Seine, upriver from Paris, of the plant for slow-filtering over gravel and sand, did riverwater become once more fit for human consumption. But it was no longer pumped straight from the Seine, outside: it came into interiors by means of pipes. Ironically then, the Seine flowing in the pipes was more natural than the Seine flowing in its bed. In the water supply network of the city of Paris today there flows a second pre-modern Seine: a re-formation in miniature of natural hydrology, unpolluted water, a chemical reproduction of a state of nature prior the 19th century.
My Via Carte Blanche project aims at bringing about a similar reversal, by projecting the interior towards the exterior. It aims at encapsulating nature in architecture, in order to qualify
interior space sensually, chemically and spatially, and to confer on it visual qualities that can also be appreciated by our senses of smell, touch and taste. My work unfolds in the framework of sustainable development applied to construction design, and integrates objectives such as the significant reduction of energy consumed in buildings and the subsequent diminishing of heat loss and hothouse-effect gas emissions. In this project, the way I address basic issues of air and temperature control generate new interior landscapes, like a second nature, where geological, plantlife and atmospheric conditions reappear in all their asymmetry, re-shaped to scale inside architecture by means of technical systems that obey the objectives of sustainable development.
My proposal reconstitutes chemically and mechanically the geology and atmosphere of Paris prior to the appearance of
wholescale pollution in the 19th century, like a natural reality that is filtered and regenerated. As such it represents a process that is simultaneously nostalgic and prospective, a scale-model reconstitution of the geology surrounding Paris and of its atmosphere in pre-modern times, with its limestone strata and semi-oceanic climate, prevalent winds blowing mainly from the Atlantic, the west, sweeping over the eroding limestone strata of Normandy and the white chalk bedrock of the Loire valley country, becoming impregnated with their minerality and the scents of oak and chestnut forests typical of the soils of these regions. A movement of air, a wind-direction reproduced homothetically on the scale of the house; a vector ranging south-west to north-east, like the invisible form of the air mass of Paris. My architecture reconstitutes this within a building, using construction techniques linked to sustainable development. It renders visible the filtered and recomposed reality of the contemporary dwelling by increasing the spectrum to include geological, plant-life and atmospheric values.

Blending air
My project integrates certain practices common to the arts of fine cuisine and wine-making, which proceed by the composition of fragrances and savours, induced by the precise choosing of ingredients. It is like a recipe, or a wine-maker”s formula. What is important is not so much the visual or colourrelated presence of materials as their chemical nature in terms of smell and taste, and the assemblage of these things. My fit-out is composed of elements that are qualified on the corporal and physical level, even to their smell, and others that are chemically neutral. This process resembles the way specialists in oenology put together a wine, and is applied here to air and interior living space, the objectives being:
° to purify air by filtering out impurities,
° to change its aromas,
° to complete the “structure” of the air by adding external tannins.
Certain materials remain chemically neutral, with neither smell nor taste, and do not influence the tang of the air, just as stainless steel used in kitchen pans or cellar vats does not modify the taste of foodstuffs or wines. Polyethylene, for example, is a material that is recyclable, neutral, non acid, non alkaline, and has pH 7; as such it does not interfere chemically with other materials. This is why it is often used in the conservation of works of art, just as it is used for packaging foodstuffs.

De-territorialising chemical, electromagnetic and physical factors
My project aims at recomposing a specific milieu in an interior, using construction techniques, control of air and air-flow with
extraction of heat, heating and ventilation. Like specific milieus, micro-regions with chemical, electromagnetic and physical properties are set to work in an interior, de-territorialised or a-territorial, evoking a specific type of soil, climate, exposure to
sunlight, and scents and tangs in the air. Different kinds of limestone, quarried in the Parisian basin, frame the air in the interior. Precise composition proceeds by homothetic reduction, with the proportional share-out of plant species and trees common to the Parisian basin, mainly oak and chestnut, but including beech and pine, which impart fragrances to the air, while glass, polyethylene and stainless steel constitute chemically neutral components in the architectural composition of the living space.

Working with construction techniques linked
to sustainable development If my proposal addresses what is immaterial, aerial, and invisible, it is because that is where the big issue lies, namely the reduction of hot-house effect emissions due to construction products and heating and ventilation techniques. Today, it is not so much the choice of materials that is responsible for climate change as the quantity of energy expended every day in buildings for heating and cooling. So it is in the ways and means of air flow, the quality of temperatures, the sense-related and electromagnetic factors in interiors – the invisible part of living space – that we find the major issues of the early 21st century. My proposal relies on three basics: dual-flow air renewal, asymmetrical heating, with varied radiation, and low-energy lighting. Each of these elements responds in turn to three objectives for valorising interior space: an ecological objective, a physiological objective, and a third objective which is the naturalisation of interior space by reformulating the specific conditions of a natural milieu inside a building. It is in the framework of this third objective that I have tried to reproduce the atmosphere and light of “pre-modern” Paris. In doing so, there is also the fiction of retrieving a certain time frame, circa 1831, in perpetual mode, prior to massive emissions of hot-house gases in the atmosphere.
The interior environment of the house becomes a sort of phantom removed from the time flow of the external environment, a sort of “u-chronic” Paris “where global warming has never been”. This distorsion of space/time in the interior, creates the weather, air and light of an “eternal Paris”.
By its inscription in history, this reference to a local milieu recalls certain project themes of post-modernism in the 70s-80s, in its symbolic, imaginary and narrative dimension. But here we have a sort of chemical post-modernism, almost culinary, in the very heart of matter and its related phenomena.

What is the “VIA Carte Blanche”
grant? In the framework of its mission to promote and valorize French creation, every year VIA awards one or several “Carte Blanche” grants to designers whose originality and maturity of creative approach are outstanding for the period. A committee composed of well-known figures from industry, distribution, creation, education and the press attributes this research grant to the selected designer to enable him/her to develop a personal project of a prospective character, which may involve improved functional logic or the use of new materials or technologies. Designers receive support from VIA all along the project elaboration process. “Carte Blanche” awards also give manufacturers, producers and distributors the chance to discover and meet the talented people who are designing the everyday products of tomorrow.


13 VIA Projects Assistance Grants

What is a VIA Project Assistance grant?
In its role as a discoverer of young talent, VIA analyses all the projects that are spontaneously submitted by designers every year. A committee composed of well-known figures from industry, distribution, creation, education and the press reviews these projects and selects those that appear to be the most relevant and innovative in terms of design, technique, aesthetics and environmental. Financing for the construction of prototypes is then allotted. This enables direct dialogue between the designer and the manufacturer or producer, with an eye to finding a market opening. VIA project assistance thus provides a valuable means of expression for all young design school graduates. Apart from the promotion aspect, designers also benefit by the fact that VIA puts them in direct contact with manufacturers. At the same time, VIA Project Assistance grants give manufacturers, producers and distributors the chance to discover and meet the talented people who are designing the products of tomorrow.

Samuel ACCOCEBERRY - "Air chair" stackable chairs
The technique for this piece relies on the close interlocking of seven curved wooden laths aseembled in decreasing height. The splay of the laths constitutes the back, their joining low down forms the rear base. Material is honed to the strict essential, but the rhythm of the laths creates a visual effect. Stacked Air Chairs save space and provide graphic and colourful animation. Wood, the recyclable material par excellence, is joined using biological glue.

Blackmamouth (Mathieu GALARD, Cédric HABERT and Frédéric POISSON)
"Arbre à table" outdoor furniture element
Simply moulded, the concrete shell, used as a mono-bloc, is fitted to the tree trunk, a natural and inseparable support for the console. The smooth horizontal top curves in at its centre so that liquids will run off and for ease of maintenance. The grainy texture of the vertical base invites lichens to come on board and complete insertion in the natural milieu. A utility surface for taking a break or sharing convivial moments, Arbre à table finds its place as street furniture or in a private garden. Elementary in its technique, its concrete can be poured in situ to eliminate ecological impact caused by transport.

Joran BRIAND - "Climbing lamp"
Sold in a kit, the principle of this strip lamp relies on fluo tubes assembled in 3D articulation. The user chooses the number of modules to be used (there are 8 in all) thus designing a luminous chain the graphics of which obey spatial constraints. Fixation points enable the lamp to hug walls and ceiling. Each strip can be adjusted to a given direction to ensure optimal quality in lighting according to needs. F luorescent technology was chosen for the good ratio if offers between long life, low consumption and cost of components.

Itamar BURSTEIN - "Unit" bookshelf
An all-wood bookshelf, Unit is an evolutive solution that can be built up in phase with needs simply by buying and adding the necessary modules. Two pieces of wood assembled by dowel pins form the open-ended structure. The profile of these elements unfolds in continuous lines with no break. Various options for combinations offer decorative and functional freedom.

Salomé FONTAINIEU and Godefroy DE VIRIEU - "Lamellé décollé" chair
An unusual interpretation of the glulam technique, this unglued-lam offers controlled flexibility. Zones exempt from glue allow movement up to tension block point. This technique takes clever advantage of the technical properties of wood. The process contributes to aesthetics that are sophisticated and discreet.

Constance GUISSET - "Dancing’ chair" rocking chair
The graphic strip structure in wooden laths delimits an ample yet light volume over which fits an upholstered shell. Dancing
Chair is a contemporary interpretation of the rocking chair, and part of its interest lies in its excellent workmanship.

Constance GUISSET and Grégory CID - "Tri3" recycling bin
This waste disposal unit responds to daily needs for selective separation. The stacking of three distinct receptacles, each commanded by its own pedal push, limits encumbrance of floorspace. Two of the trays are offset from the central axis at different angles, the lower one for glass, the middle one for paper. Organic wastes go in at the top simply by lifting the hood. Controlled cinematic sequences developed from actual body movements during usage simplify a complex system.

Bruno HOUSSIN - "Sesta" seat
The innovating principle of this seat lies in the simultaneous presence of a heat-moulded polyester shell covered by foam and fabric. The sandwiching of all three materials ensures solidity, thinness, liberty of shape, and comfort. The seamless textile cover makes the seat’s line all the more fine and clear. Dissociable and stackable shell and structure facilitate transport and storage.

Philippe NIGRO - "Twin chair"
Based on the idea of two-in-one, these twin chairs remain functional even when stacked. The difficulty in putting them together lay in the juxtaposition of two materials that have distinct physical properties. Fitting the two chairs together means cutting down these materials to the absolute minimum while retaining mechanical resistance, which required knowhow in both joinery and metalwork. Mono-materials – wood and metal – ensure that Twin Chairs are easy to recycle.

Philippe NIGRO - "Universal base"
This trestle-like solution for a multi-use base adapts to all types of plateaux, regardless of thickness, width, length and material. It brings together a clamp-type assembly system and a sliding principle that allows adjustment of width. For an extra-long top, three bases are used. The supports are made of folded and welded steel, thus bringing industrial workshop codes into habitat. They enable installations that are personalized, permanent or adaptable.

Antoine PHELOUZAT - "Mesh" table
Mesh offers many functions: storage, meals, work. Its resolution relies on the same industrial technology as that used for building supermarket trolleys. Mesh transposes this technology in open-ended configurations suited for the home, going beyond the dimensions generally used for this fabrication process. The steel mesh is either coated with Epoxy paint or an electro-polished stainless steel finish, both solutions having no toxic chemical agents.

Renaud THIRY - "Corniche" suspension
The components of this piece are made using the industrial process for extruded aluminium profiles. Renaud Thiry integrates these profiles to interior decoration as mouldings, reinterpreting their aesthetic codes. The decorative aspect is imparted by both profile and colour, which enter into dialogue with furnishings and architecture. Functionality is enhanced by including a fluorescent tube in each segment of Corniche. Feasibility of installation is studied before cutting the profile, after which the semi-finished product is mounted on site.

Marc VENOT - "Pélican" bedside unit
Marc Venot explores body movements and storage needs for everyday objects in bedsisde table contexts. A simple hand
movement activates rotation of the receptacle on a central axis, and opens the compartment. Ditto for closing. The fixed plateau serves as hood and table top. Pelican is made of wood and chrome steel finish for exterior, with lacquer finish inside. The principle adapts in dimensions and extends to other uses.



VIA Partnership Project "Padded board" by François Azambourg with Frédéric Morand

What is the VIA Partnership Project?
The VIA Partnership Project gives designers the opportunity to develop a project in tandem with a manufacturer, using innovative technologies and/or materials. The initiative aims at encouraging exchanges of know-how and skills with an eye to experimenting new solutions for furnishing and interior decorating.

"Padded board"
The duo is engaged in research on renewable composite materials. Linen was chosen for its mechanical properties, such as resistance to torsion, its light weight and low cost. Plant fibres are used to form a panel – a basic component of the furniture manufacturing industry. The fibres are overlaid in many directions and interwoven with polyamide. The double-sided fabric thus woven is put into a mould and shaped by heat-injection under pressure. This causes the polyamide to melt, thus entering into fusion with the linen fibres in the manner of a traditional composite. When it cools, the mix crystallizes to form a rigid structure. The panel has unusual aesthetics, like a textile in three dimensions, plus untold potential for textures and colours. François Azambourg and Frédéric Morand (DCS) have applied the process in the fabrication of a table top that demonstrates all its qualities: technical performance, economy, and durability of an innovative material. The process was invented by François Azambourg and is patented.

Coordination : Michel Bouisson (Head of Creation Assistance & relations with schools VIA)

Press : Pauline Lacoste lacoste@mobilier.com - tél. +33(0)1 46 28 11 11 - fax +33 (0)1 46 28 13 13

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Project Assistance grant - Arbre à table
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Arbre à table
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Arbre à table
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Arbre à table
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Arbre à table
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Table Mesh
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Table Mesh
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Table Mesh
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Table Mesh
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Table Mesh
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Table Mesh
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Table Mesh
© VIA/ Marie Flores

© DR

Project Assistance grant - Sesta
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Sesta
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Sesta
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Sesta
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Sesta
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Sesta
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Sesta
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Sesta
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Sesta
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Sesta
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Sesta
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Sesta
© VIA/ Marie Flores

© DR

Project Assistance grant - Tri 3*
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Tri 3*
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Tri 3*
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Tri 3*
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Dancing chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Dancing chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Dancing chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Dancing chair
© F. Ribon

Project Assistance grant - Dancing chair
© F. Ribon

Project Assistance grant - Dancing chair
© F. Ribon

© DR

Partnership Project - panneau
© DR

Partnership Project - panneau
© VIA/ Marie Flores

© DR

© DR

© DR

© DR

Project Assistance grant - Unit bookshelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Unit bookshelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Unit bookshelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Unit bookshelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Unit bookshelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Unit bookshelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Unit bookshelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Unit bookshelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Unit bookshelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

© DR

Project Assistance grant - Lampe grimpante
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Lampe grimpante
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Lampe grimpante
© VIA/ Marie Flores

© DR

© DR

Project Assistance grant - Pélican
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Pélican
© VIA/ Marie Flores

© DR

Project Assistance grant - Piètement
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Piètement
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Piètement
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Piètement
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Piètement
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Piètement
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Piètement
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Piètement
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Piètement
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Twin chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Twin chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Twin chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Twin chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Twin chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Twin chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Twin chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Twin chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Twin chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

© DR

Carte Blanche grant - chauffage (photo)
© A. Dupuis

Carte Blanche grant - chauffage (3D)
© DR

Carte Blanche grant - chauffage (3D)
© DR

Carte Blanche grant - éclairage (photo)
© A. Dupuis

Carte Blanche grant - éclairage (photo)
© A. Dupuis

Carte Blanche grant - éclairage (photo)
© A. Dupuis

Carte Blanche grant - éclairage (3D)
© DR

Carte Blanche grant - éclairage (3D)
© DR

Carte Blanche grant - ventilation (photo)
© A. Dupuis

Carte Blanche grant - ventilation (3D)
© DR

Carte Blanche grant - ventilation (3D)
© DR

Carte Blanche grant - mobilier (3D)
© DR

Carte Blanche grant - vue globale (photo)
© A. Dupuis

Carte Blanche grant - vue globale (3D)
© DR

Carte Blanche grant - schéma chauffage
© DR

Carte Blanche grant - schéma chauffage
© DR

Carte Blanche grant - schéma éclairage
© DR

Carte Blanche grant - schéma éclairage
© DR

Carte Blanche grant - schéma ventilation
© DR

Carte Blanche grant - schéma ventilation
© DR

© P. Fantys

© G. Foerster

© DR

Project Assistance grant - Corniche
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Corniche
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Corniche
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Corniche
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Corniche
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Corniche
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Corniche
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Corniche
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Corniche
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Corniche
© VIA/ Marie Flores

© DR

Project Assistance grant - Lamellé-décollé
© S. de Fontainieu / G. de Virieu

Project Assistance grant - Lamellé-décollé
© S. de Fontainieu / G. de Virieu

Project Assistance grant - Lamellé-décollé
© S. de Fontainieu / G. de Virieu

Project Assistance grant - Lamellé-décollé
© S. de Fontainieu / G. de Virieu

Project Assistance grant - Lamellé-décollé
© S. de Fontainieu / G. de Virieu

Project Assistance grant - Lamellé-décollé
© S. de Fontainieu / G. de Virieu

Project Assistance grant - Lamellé-décollé
© S. de Fontainieu / G. de Virieu

© DR

Project Assistance grant - Air chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Air chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Air chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Air chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Air chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

© DR

Partnership Project - panneau
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Partnership Project - panneau
© VIA - Azambourg - DCS

Project Assistance grant - Air chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Air chair
© VIA/ Marie Flores

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