FREN

JEAN-PAUL BATH
Executive Director of VIA

Biography

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VIA Design 2008

VIA was formed by the French furniture manufacturers and the ministry of Industry in order to promote and contribute to innovation in the field of the « living space ». In this context, innovation is considered in all its different forms. First of all we address sociological issues which touch on human behavior, be this individual or collective.

This consists in the consideration of factors which contribute to the evolution of our society and which have an influence on the adaptation of existing products or the conception of those of the future. The furnishings and objects which compose our environment are thus considered as natural companions to our gestures and movements.New materials and technologies, be this artisanal or industrial, constitute the second basis of innovation. Let us note that, since the beginning of the industrial era, progress in these domains has always opened the way to the development of new fields of creation. Lastly, the cultural factors of a period are a source of innovation in that they generate the trends, give meaning and define a precise moment in time in the historical continuum of design. It is on this basis that VIA seeks to discover the talented young designers of today.
The selection of projects supported by VIA is the expression of this ambition as they are chosen on the basis of fundamental design elements: conceptual pertinence, technological innovativeness, exemplarity of social / environmental approach, originality of aesthetics and industrial feasibility. Once the projects are chosen, VIA finances the prototyping with the support of the CODIFA, the FCBA and the various CRITT Île-de-France. Beyond this, VIA accompanies the designer in the development of his project and puts him/her in contact with manufacturers, editors or distributors who may be interested.
In this way the VIA « Project Assistance Grants », which are awarded to students in design schools and young professionals, are an important resource for the discovery of tomorrow’s talents.Since its creation 28 years ago, VIA has financed 414 projects and awarded 65 research grants.

Gérard Laizé - Chief executive VIA.

’Carte Blanche’ grant: Jean Louis Frechin "Interface(s)

In the places we live in, objects of everyday comfort cohabit with high performance technological objects that are complex and often intrusive. In time, with the convergence of digital applications, new devices developed by computer science seem destined to replace all the electronic devices that are familiar to us – stereo and TV sets, telephones, radios. In their new formats they will be digital interfaces connected to networks, proposing enhanced ranges of services. In the world of tomorrow, we are told, the home will be an ‘intelligent environment’, thanks to these omnipresent networks. The household appliances of the near future will be interconnected to form an ‘internet of objects’. Some forecasters propose specific objects, relatively intrusive, visible and complex; others take an opposite line, concealing machines and networks to fabricate ‘wired’ spaces in which none of the real workings are visible (pervasive computerization). But neither of these propositions sufficiently integrates human factors to the technology. As such, they run the risk of creating everyday devices that people can neither understand nor control, even though their functions aim at improving the way we live. In view of this, it is important that we propose other scenarios, to embody and represent digital services that are user- friendly. It is also of prime importance that we inscribe digital technologies in the intimate and emotion-fraught contexts of living space. For it is vital that we see and understand the devices that surround us, all the better to appropriate them, invent other uses, and recognize possible risks. Starting out from these issues, the ‘Interface(s)’ project proposes a ‘hybridization’ of new relational technologies with the ‘legitimate’ objects of living space: furniture, elements for decoration, comfort, lighting and so on. These ‘hybrid’ objects thus become supports or diffusers of on-line services. They embody the visible and user-friendly interfaces that mediate relations between people in a wide range of practises in the home: computer-enabled pastimes, communication services and comfort-related devices. In their material presence, these ‘relational objects’ are discreet, soft and emotional, even if they relay all the potential offered by information and communication science. For the designers and makers of services and technologies for habitat, an approach like this constitutes a new paradigm as well as a challenge to innovate.

Wanetkight M - designing light
Wanetlight is a luminous suspension composed of 25 blown glass candles that form a three-dimensional matrix of light. Easy body movements control the intensity level and rearrange the luminous volumes in space. The array is a pretext for exploring new relations with advanced technology objects. A new kind of manipulation is introduced, simplifying the use of electronic products. Wanetlight is composed of 5x5x5 LEDs clustered in the three axes (LxWxH). The cluster forms a luminous 3-D screen cage. Each LED can be individually piloted to enable users to configure all sorts of light compositions in space. The control device uses a radio frequency transmitter activated by hand, which commands the sensors that pilot the ascending/descending movements of the LEDs.

Wadoor Up - door-screen
WaDoor is a screen-object proposal for both the home and public spaces. It is a door that turns into a screen. The screen is low tech, formed of a sheet of electro-luminescent paper that configures 640 pixels. The door-screen is controlled by software that enables users to ‘post-produce’ its configuration according to specific use and environment. This project has two objectives: - propose digital ‘wallpaper’ that can carry programmable, large format information or atmosphere displays; - enable the creation of personalized environments composed of atmospheres and patterns, in a reactive and recreative choreography. WaDoor is a door-screen with a low resolution electro-luminescent surface. It is composed 16*40 ‘EL pixel’ modules. Each EL bulb can be piloted individually, allowing users to write information messages or draw patterns. The system is connected to a computer to download files and as a door serves as a man-machine interface that reacts to direct body movements.

Wasnahe ELA - Talking object
WaSnake is a shelf whose topology can be reconfigured to suit any specific space or whim. It is also a luminous digital object and a device for relaying discreet information in the home – comments, addresses, the useful and the playful. - WaSnake displays SMS messages sent to the home address. - WaSnake proposes easy presence and communication between homes in a luminous choreography. - WaSnake displays luminous news-sheets from the user-selected RSS. - WaSnake enables monitoring of consumer trends for the home. In ‘digital matter’ inactive mode, it proposes selected or user-created luminous animations, etc. WaSnake has two objectives: - propose a communicating object that enables a discreet, fluid and visual experience (digital matter) in the home context; - create a hybrid, multi-functional object that is both physical and digital. WaSnake is a furniture accessory in wood and elastomer. It houses a cluster of coloured LEDs and optical fibres that form a screen. The system is linked to a computer and serves as an interface for selecting and creating information and communication channels. It is also an interface for direct physical contact, by which users choose various display protocols. The operating software is composed of independent units (Widgets) each linked to parts of the shelf.

Waaz AL - music support
Waaz is a shelf connected to a computer that doubles as a device for audio diffusion and archiving digital music files (MP3). Waaz also offers alternative protocols to those for the archiving and playing of audio files. The interface for selecting and playing music is original because there is none. The mere presence of an audio CD or of specific labels launches or stops the music in the play slot: the cover is the wand. The materialization of the performing artist’s world and image are relayed by a physical support. A device and a piece of furniture, a stereo set and a shelf, Waaz is an interface-object that fills the gap between immaterial music and tracks stored on physical supports. Wazz AL is a piece of furniture in wood. It is also an audio-stereo set connected to a computer. It has a 2*30w amplifier, two medium bass loud speakers, a communication system at radio frequency (Wifi) and a detection interface that uses RfiD chips. The system works in interface with a computer that stores MP3 files. The piloting software is composed of independent units (Widgets) that enable the user to produce his or her own disc covers or compilations and to connect them to the system.

Wapix YJMM - photo – pictures
The photo has become photos. Flows, series and sequences fabricated by digital manipulation transform the photo into pictures. Wapix YJMM is a duo of ‘chrono-pictographic’ frames. These frames display moments, places and situations rather than snapshots. Wapix JMYM enables the continual flow of pictures from one frame to the other. By moving the frames apart in space, the speed of image flow is regulated. The farther apart, the swifter the flow of one picture to the next. The screen displaying these pictures is translucent, which gives the image the quality of a digital ektachrome. It is sensitive to surrounding light, and this also gives a specific visual quality to pictures, unlike that of the standard screens that occupy living space. Wapix YJMM is a device for diffusing photographic picture flows and is composed of two translucent screens, a back-lighting system and proximity sensors destined to transform the object into a regulating interface. The frames extract pictures from computer files via a radio frequency (wifi). The piloting software is composed of independent units (Widgets) that enable the user to put together his or her own display flows.

10 Project Assistance grants 2008

Shelf ’ Infinity’ by Samuel Accoceberry
‘Infinity’ is a shelf system that fits into curves and corners on walls by means of supple yet resistant plywood laths set on an alignment of consoles. Once mounted, its visual continuity appears to be devoid of break-off points. ‘Infinity’ comes in a kit to be assembled by the user, who adapts it to the imperatives of the space to be fitted out. The components – wood and metal – are separate, to facilitate recycling.
Materials used: Birch ply laths, lacquered metal
Dimensions: L. 150 (module may be shortened or extended) x W. 35 x H. 7 cm
Prototype made by: Prototype Concept (wood), Cockpit (metal)

Standing lamp ’Pull Over’ by Bina Baïtel
Bina Baitel has imagined a light that integrates the principle of variation of intensity to manipulation of its form. ‘Pull Over’ is made of interwoven luminous textile strips tied at the base, but flaring vertically upwrds. An external coat of silicone ensures the rigidity and opacity of the cone thus formed. The inside part of the cone is coated with translucent silicone. By pulling the cone rim down, inside out, more or less, the user modulates the intensity of light, adapting it to needs. Fully lit, the lamp’s cone is upside down, and the treatment of its optical fibres enables an enlargement of the halo while limiting electricity consumption. The demountable hollow structure enables easy recuperation of materials when the lamp becomes obsolete.
Materials used: Woven Lightex optical fibres for lateral halo, flexible silicone, 21 LEDs, base & structure in metal.
Dimensions: W. 64.5 x max. H. 168 cm
Prototype made by: Brochier Technologies, Ateliers Stéphane Gérard, Cockpit, ADS Laminaire (Eric Fitoussi).
Partner: CRITT environment chemistry.

Lamp & shade ’Lamp malep leamp peaml…’ by Gabriel Dufour et Samuel Prigent
Apart from its function, ‘Lamp malep leamp peaml’ offers freedom of evolution by its structure. The frame of the shade is designed as a juxtaposition of identical metal modules that are articulated and can change position. The structure is covered by textile; the whole lamp comes in a kit. Assemblage is simple; distribution via retail outlets cuts handling and transport. Dissociation of components means ease of recycling when the object is obsolete.
Lustre
Matériaux constitutifs : Acier inox, coton bio
Dimensions : Ø 55 x H.55 cm
Lampe de chevet
Matériaux constitutifs : Acier inox, PVC « reflective prism »
Dimensions : Ø 40 x H. 45 cm
Prototypiste : Metiss

Storage unit ’Fossile’ by Mostapha El Oulhani, Jérôme Garzon & Fred Sionis
In the home, terra cotta is mostly present in the form of bricks, but here it claims a place in interior layout. The honey-combed egg-shaped modules of ‘Fossile’ can be stacked in random array and interlock by means of external track grooves. The viability of the concept relies on this particular material, since its texture and weight are part and parcel of the composition’s stability. Modules are fired in an eco-friendly kiln (fed by sawdust, paper). When modules become obsolete, powdered terra cotta can be recycled as a raw material (tamped surfaces as in tennis courts, infill) or even to make new pieces.
Material used: Terra cotta in extruded form
Dimensions: L. 55 ,5 x W. 39,5 x H. 25 cm
Prototype made by: Rairies Montrieux, Hugo Jakubec
Partners: Rairies Montrieux, CRITT environment chemistry

Storage system ’Tube_Box’ by Thorsten Franck
Putting things away in a cupboard is not something kids like doing, but here the constraint is sidetracked by playful possibilities. The basic drum shape of the caissons appeals to the imagination: chest, table, stool, tower, wagon… The cover and wheel base animate an instructive building game, in which modules are stacked, joined or used solo. Adults can use the system too. Light-weight, tough, and comfortable to use for its acoustic properties, polypropylene is also easy to recycle.
Materials used: Oak (base) ; plastic, rubber, metal (wheels) ; expanded polypropylene EPP (caisson & cover)
Dimensions: Caisson + cover + base: W. 36 x H. 28 cm ; caisson: W. 36 x H. 22 cm
Prototype made by: JSP International GmbH &Co. KG, Bätz möbel GmbH

Bookshelf Rambler_Rose by Thorsten Franck
Thorsten Franck has developed a simple solution for an evolving bookshelf. The free-standing structure is built by combining two basic elements: aluminium planking and fibreglass reinforced polyurethane cross ties. The structure proliferates, meshing to form a set, the sole ornamental effect results from assemblage. The components are of small size and are designed to enable replacement or repairs, which means that ‘Rambler Rose’ is a product that lasts.
Materials used: Powder coated aluminium, fibreglass reinforced polyurethane
Dimensions: Plank: 76 x 32 x 2,9 cm support: 38,5 x 29 x 2,7 cm
Prototype made by: Gerg Rapid Prototyping GmbH

Moveable lamp ’3L’ by Antoine Fritsch
Switched off, the lamp has a minimal vertical presence. Switched on, it offers considerable freedom of movement to ensure optimal service. The deployment of its arms turns the light on.The balancing of the two articulated arms and the integration of LED technology demanded delicate fine-tuning. The balance is what ensures the extreme ease of manipulation of the lamp. Aluminium and steel are easily recyclable. The choice of LEDs – which use less energy – is part of the project economy.
Materials used: Aluminium, steel, LEDs
Dimensions: Vertical: 26, 6 x 14 x H. 85 cm; deployed: H. 76 cm, with amplitude of movement W. 93 cm
Prototype made by: Protostyle

Storage pieces ’Around’ by Joachim Jirou-Najou
‘Around’ displays an unusual response to the use of fabric in furniture. The principle is that of a textile envelope made rigid by armatures, like the sail of a yacht. The skin hides the structure, which is composed of steel tubes and wooden plateaux. The use of fabric offers freedom of form and facilitates opening (magnet system). The simplicity of fabrication and the use of bio-degradable materials reflect concerns for the environment.
Materials used: Solid sycamore (finish: water-base varnish), lacquered steel, polypropylene plastic, fabric: raw wool and viscose, crush-dyed (‘Hallingdal’ fabric by Kvadrat carries an EU eco-label)
Dimensions: Long piece: H. 87 x L. 120 x W. 40 cm; High piece: H. 116 x L. 80 x W. 40 cm
Prototype made by: Prototype Concept (structures), Sellerie Selaneuf (textile envelopes)

Stool ’Particule’ by Adrien Rovero
Adrien Rovero has borrowed the industrial technology used for making loading pallets. His stool is made of compressed and moulded wood chips (their volume reduced to a quarter of real size). With its compact dimensions, the stool responds to the constraints of the material used. All three legs are made using the same mould, which facilitates mass production and enables delivery in parts. The stools are stackable.Adhesion of the wood chips is ensured by a natural adhesive made from tannin, a substance extracted from the bark of certain trees.
Materials used: Wood chips, tannin
Dimensions: 34 x 34 cm x H. 37 cm
Prototype made by: HSB, Haute école Spécialisée Bernoise, department of architecture, timber and civil engineering.
Partners: CRITT Meca, Edouard Larmaraud (designer in Paris), HSB, Haute école Spécialisée Bernoise, department of architecture, timber and civil engineering.
Bench ’Tôl’ by Benjamin Tortiger
Benjamin Tortiger has inscribed the fabrication of his bench in a well-known industrial process. The mechanical qualities of folded steel validate the wide span of ‘Tôl’. Corner seams are arc welded; the seat is a flat steel sheet. Apart from their technical function, the folds add rhythm to the aesthetics, contrasting with the clear line of the seat. Easily recyclable, steel limits off-cuts and rejects.
Materials used: Steel, epoxy paint
Dimensions: Bench 180: L. 180 x W. 37 ,5 x H. 45 cm; Bench 90: L. 90 x W. 37 ,5 x H. 45 cm
Prototype made by: COMAT

Partnership VIA

It is always surprising to see how often evolution and progressions in our society oppose players working in the same field. The fact is that since the Industrial Revolution mass production is in rivalry with the skilled trades. The extensive means of big manufacturing firms have accentuated differences, and at the same time they have raised performance levels as well as standards of quality and security. Deprived of comparable means, many skilled trades, in spite of their level of excellence, have fallen into a ‘folklore’ niche, taking refuge in values of tradition and authenticity rather than aiming at innovation and creation. But ironically, today the average quality of artisan production is often lower than that of advanced industry. And it is industry that is more concerned with reassuring the public, which is fearful and critical of the inroads of aggressive international competition. A broader view of things suggests that there is no need to oppose these two modes of production, since they are complementary. The evolutions of society on one hand, and technological advances on the other, have largely contributed to establishing overlaps. The former constitute a factor that reflects the growing demand for personalization in supply, which favours small series or even tailor-made or one-off pieces, with follow-up and service guaranteed. The latter rely mainly on digital technologies, which are accessible to small and large firms alike today. Workshops now have the chance to optimize their output and to re-assert their traditional skills in modern-day contexts. New materials also contribute to this movement, since they are no longer destined to be used by heavy industry alone. As for creation, it has never shown partiality: it has always used all the means of production available, depending on the type of product and the numbers to be made. In the framework of its Project Assistance programme for designers, from the outset VIA has regularly commissioned skilled artisans to build prototypes of selected projects. The search for excellence in know-how, the curiosity and cleverness of professionals, and the time available for the work are fundamental criteria in choosing these workshops, which are like experimental research and development laboratories. They constitute an indispensable stage before envisaging industrial production. It is in this spirit that the partnership between VIA and the Compagnons du Devoir journeymen has been conducted. Backed by the expertise of their Institute for Flexible Materials, the Compagnons have contributed the skills for making a range of seating created by designer Philippe Nigro. Young upholsterers and leather-workers training with the Compagnons du Devoir accepted the challenge to make these prototypes. The project is doubly beneficial as an aid in teaching specialized skills. To begin with, it familiarizes trainees in traditional skilled trades with innovative materials that need to be handled using specific new techniques. In the second place, it enables these trades to update their training programmes by collaborating with contemporary creation. The level of excellence obtained is the result of exceptional three-sided involvement, bringing together the eight trainee upholsterers and leather-workers, who with their three tutors, have proven their capacity to integrate innovation to the specific context of training, the designer and two artisan firms, who were willing to take part in this teaching programme and handled its materials and logistics.The entire experience has been a resounding success in mobilizing people and means around a project. The VIA / Compagnons du Devoirpartnershipis an example to be continued.
Creation and skilled trades VIA / Les Compagnons du Devoir
Designer Philippe Nigro
Divans ’Intersection’

The artisan skills of upholsterers and leather-workers combined with advanced production techniques bring enhanced precision to this play on illusion. ‘Intersection’ uses fragmented seating modules composed in juxtaposed and interlocked array. Their reconstituted puzzle multiplies variations on height of back-rest and depth of seat, enabling varied postures. Besides the loss of formal space-markers, trompe l’œil effects are introduced by plays on colours of fabric; the intersection of modulesis materialized by their chromatic presence.
Materials used: Wood, polyurethane foams, wool fabrics.
Dimensions:
composition green (2 short seats): 230 x 140 x H. 88 cm
composition bleu (3 seats): 300 x 150 x H.88 cm
composition orange (seat + day-bed): 140 x 130 cm x H. 88 cm
Prototypes made by: Compagnons du Devoir (upholsterers, leather-workers), Institut des Matériaux Souples, Polybe & Malet, FICA.

Juries

Jean louis Frechin was chosen by a jury of professionals who represent all the branches of the furnishing sector. The commission met in January and March 2007. Along with four VIA representatives, the jury members were:
Jean-Marc Barbier (FCBA), Thierry de Beaumont (La revue de la Céramique et du Verre), Michel Bouisson (VIA), Vincent Créance (Agence MBD Design), Yves Gradelet (VIA), Philippe Jarniat (VIA), Gérard Laizé (VIA), Marc Partouche (ENSCI / Les Ateliers – Cité du Design de Saint-Étienne, Didier Roux (Cuisines Roux – Hardy).
The 10 projects presented here derive from a selection made by a panel of professionals composed of representatives from all branches of the furnishing sector (manufacturers, distributors, producers, teachers, journalists, institutional heads, designers). The commission for Project assistance grants was convened on April 2007. It was composed of the following professionals:
Jean Marc Barbier (FCBA), Michel Bouisson (VIA), Philippe Comte (Designer / Agence Gulliver), Yves Gradelet (VIA), Philippe Jarniat (VIA), Gérard Laizé (VIA), Philippe Madec (Architecte / Agence Philippe Madec), Joëlle Malichaud (DAP), Nicolas Roche (Roche-bobois), Michel Roset (Groupe Roset), Dominique Serrell (Agence Terres Nuages).

Coordination : Michel Bouisson ( Head of Creation Assistance & relations with schools VIA)

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Project Assistance grant - Lamp malep leamp peaml… lamp & shade
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Lamp malep leamp peaml… lamp & shade
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Lamp malep leamp peaml… lamp & shade
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Lamp malep leamp peaml… lamp & shade
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Fossile storage unit
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Fossile storage unit
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Fossile storage unit
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Fossile storage unit
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Fossile storage unit
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Creation & Skilled Trades - Intersection divans
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Creation & Skilled Trades - Intersection divans
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Creation & Skilled Trades - Intersection divans
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Creation & Skilled Trades - Intersection divans
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Creation & Skilled Trades - Intersection divans
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Creation & Skilled Trades - Intersection divans
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Particule stool
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Particule stool
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Particule stool
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Particule stool
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Particule stool
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - 3L moveable lamp
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - 3L moveable lamp
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - 3L moveable lamp
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - 3L moveable lamp
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - 3L moveable lamp
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - 3L moveable lamp
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Pull Over standing lamp
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Pull Over standing lamp
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Pull Over standing lamp
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Pull Over standing lamp
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - Wanetlight M, variable 3D lighting suspension lamp
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - Wanetlight M, variable 3D lighting suspension lamp
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - Wanetlight M, variable 3D lighting suspension lamp
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - Wanetlight M, variable 3D lighting suspension lamp
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - Wanetlight M, variable 3D lighting suspension lamp
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - Wanetlight M, variable 3D lighting suspension lamp
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - WaDoor, door-screen
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - WaDoor, door-screen
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - WaDoor, door-screen
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - WaDoor, door-screen
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - WaDoor, door-screen
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - WaSnake ELA, modular shelf, luminous digital object
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - WaSnake ELA, modular shelf, luminous digital object
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - WaSnake ELA, modular shelf, luminous digital object
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - WaSnake ELA, modular shelf, luminous digital object
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - Waaz, shelf music player
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - Waaz, shelf music player
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - Waaz, shelf music player
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - Waaz, shelf music player
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - Wapix YJMM, chrono-pictographic frames
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - Wapix YJMM, chrono-pictographic frames
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - Wapix YJMM, chrono-pictographic frames
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Around storage pieces
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Around storage pieces
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Around storage pieces
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Around storage pieces
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Infinity shelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Infinity shelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Infinity shelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Rambler_Rose bookshelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Rambler_Rose bookshelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Rambler_Rose bookshelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Rambler_Rose bookshelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Rambler_Rose bookshelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Tube_Box storage system
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Tube_Box storage system
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Tube_Box storage system
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Tube_Box storage system
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Tôl bench
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Tôl bench
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Tôl bench
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Pull Over standing lamp
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Carte Blanche Interface(s) - Wapix YJMM, chrono-pictographic frames
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Around storage pieces
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Infinity shelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

Project Assistance grant - Infinity shelf
© VIA/ Marie Flores

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