FREN

JEAN-PAUL BATH
Executive Director of VIA

Biography

INNOVATION NEWSLETTER

Subscribe

PRATICAL INFORMATIONS
VIA Gallery

120, avenue Ledru Rollin
75011 Paris
Metro : Gare de Lyon / Ledru Rollin

Opening :

monday-friday : 9.30am – 6.30pm

FOLLOW US ON...
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Surfaces

Bearing this in mind, how are new technologies generating new décor today? How do they enter into the structure of objects? How do they affect the way things look? This show explores the surface treatments of contemporary objects by presenting a selection of international design products. The theme is illustrated in this exhibition by sets of products that represent these new techniques or processes. There are three families:
- Prints/impact-charged imagery applied to a surface by different means: covering with a material, digital etching, silk-screening, sublimation…
- Texture/which expresses the skin of the object in varied effects of surface matter or covering by pulverization, metal-coating, flaking, incorporation of fibreglass, etc.
- Technique/meaning work on material to enable passage from 2D to 3D by cutting, gouging, weaving, embossing, heat-moulding, stereo-lithography, modifying of the material’s physico-chemical structure (as in foams…), etc.
What is more, these various techniques can be combined on the same support, opening a wider palette of possibilities to creators.

Materials for innovating, creating...

Throughout the history of industrial production, the coming of new materials, technologies and processes, and the combining of all three, have opened up new fields of creation. By their structural qualities, new materials aim at increasing resistance, enabling weight gains and improving performance levels, especially as regards weight/strength ratios.The two things most easily visible to the naked eye that accompany them are changes in the dimensions of finished products, and forms that tend to be more honed down. Today, new technologies are turned towards miniaturisation. With nano-technologies, inventors are moving into the realm of the very small component, one that is virtually invisible but that enables performances that would have seemed impossible in the past. Here too, the aesthetics of objects that integrate these advances favours light weight and streamlined forms. Last but not least, the production processes associated to new materials such as polymers are developing formal registers that would have been difficult or costly to make using traditional means. Injection and roto-moulding are used to make curves, and stereo-lithography to add random details to forms. These are features that are better able to meet expectations in terms of comfort, because as everyone knows – there are no right angles in the human body. And while forms become more shapely, the materials used to make them display surface textures that are increasingly organic.

The origins of design owe a great deal to these various modes of innovation. When Charles Eames built his lounge chair, he shaped multiply using a technique borrowed from the aeronautics industry. Similarly, if the philosophy of the Bauhaus was that design should reflect a social ideal of ‘good products for everyone’, it was industrial technology that enabled its application. As manufacturers began to lower prices to make their products more accessible, the trend was to eliminate all that was not useful for function to save on materials and manipulation. Design, which brings together both function and aesthetics, came to be simplified in both form and finish. Increasingly, décor was cut closer to structure. In its radicalism, this approach was opposed to the historic French decorative arts genre, considered as one of the mainsprings of the idea of luxury in that it produced sophisticated objects, often highly ornate one-off pieces that expressed the excellence of traditional art-crafts. It was on the basis of the model of democratization by industrial design that a great deal of ornamentation came to be seen as ‘decadent’, useless and incongruous, given the principle of economy of scale.

What is the situation today? To begin with, it is clear that industrial production in the past fifty years has seen too much of the same thing being made. As a direct consequence of this, the basic needs of our contemporaries have been largely covered. At the same time, there is growing awareness that our planet cannot absorb waste indefinitely. Whether we like it or not, we are going to have to produce better, rather than produce more. And since people today are better informed and more critical, they have stronger opinions concerning functional responses in consumer products. They also tend to want things that have more meaning and emotion, that are more personal. To satisfy these needs, makers aim at improving performance levels to add user benefits, and at increasing quality, as is visible in the application of certified norms; they also copy the reference brand names and make things that are easy-to-use. At the same time, buyer-motivation encourages stylistic expression, which can be more varied now by way of smaller series.

What is more, since society at large is concerned about the uncertain future, and normative solutions often seem to be questioned without there being anything better proposed, many people dream of new utopias. In the absence of a clear political programme, it is an absolute priority to give people reasons to hope. Technology is part of this new imaginary world. And new generation technologies have yet to revolutionize our daily life: applied nano- and bio-technologies, wearable computers, body-wear phones, artificial organs for transplants... Optimism projects itself in the exploring of dimensions, from the infinitely small to the infinitely large. Human beings look up to the skies, the stars, outer space. With childlike energy they expand the dimensions of the imaginary world. Parallel worlds, fantasy-ridden fifth dimensions that draw inspiration from exuberant nature, monstrously humanized and disquieting. We see the expression of these fantasies in the literature, movies and video games that are turned towards futuristic realities. Just as we see in clothing and interior decorating that aesthetic codes are constantly reverting to the redefinition of ornamentation.

Improving performance levels and producing a single product capable of satisfying each and everyone, by using leading edge industrial techniques, appears possible today, without any added expense. Computer-assisted production offers the possibility of varying dimensions and forms in real time, ‘industrial customizing’ that is valid as much in clothing as in furniture. New techniques for cutting materials by laser or water-jet, or for printing graphics, whether they be applied by microfilm, silk-screen, inclusion or sublimation, make it possible to create an endless range of decorative effects for products. Will the industrial model link up with the hand-made piece ? Whatever the case, the idea of adding meaning is undeniably one way of adding value to products, - for both the maker and the buyer.

… materials for decorating and personalizing.

Gérard Laizé - Chief Manager VIA





Exhibition "Good finish"

The finishing touch is often the last step of any design project but it’s a fondamental step. It invests the product with difference, singularity and quality. The development of new printing technologies creates new possibilities for making more informative or decorative finishes. Special coating and new forming techniques offer delicacy or new textures. The sensory qualities of the objects surrounding us are improved.
Innovathèque invites you to dive into the subject through “Good Finish”. Structured around three axes - Impression, Texture and Technique – this exhibition offers an overview of the latest decorative and finishing technologies. With more than 70 materials and techniques on display, we bring our products’ surfaces into the spotlight.
“Good Finsih” is also a book which sum up all the informations related to the materials and techniques selected for this exhibition. Both in English and French, this book is a perfect tool for any project. This book will be available on 15 mai 2006 at Innovathèque or VIA for 40 euros.

For further informations on the exhibition or on the book “Good Finish”, please call :
sandrine cholez / +33 (0)1 40 19 48 94
10 av St mandé / 75012 PARIS
mail : scholez@ctba.fr / www.innovatheque.fr

Scenography : Yves Gradelet (architecte, scénographe - responsable des expositions)

Press : via.presse @mobilier.com - t. +33(0)1 46 28 11 11 - f. +33(0)1 46 28 13 13


Practical informations


'Surfaces' exhibition
Exhibition open every day :
Monday to Friday 10 am – 1 pm / 2 pm – 6 pm
Saturday / Sunday 1 pm / 6 pm
Free admission

HD images

NB : The images are strickly limited to the presentation and promotion of the corresponding event.
All use of images must be accompanied by the mentioned copyright.
VIA is not responsible for misuse of images.

Procedure for HD downloads

1/ Open the picture by clicking on its tag.
2/ It will then open in a new window.
3/ Right click on the image.
4/ Select "save to".

Calibrage n°3 bowl
technique
© DR

Snooze seat
technique
© DR

Beautiful Stranger armchair
texture
© DR

Sfera chair
technique
© DR

Imprint chair
technique
© DR

Tsubaki table
impression
© DR

Sacco anatomical seat
impression
© DR

Fusion room divider
texture
© DR

Labrets tables
technique
© DR

Jak chair
impression
© DR

Leaf seats
texture
© DR

Dentelle bench
technique
© DR

Random Light suspension lamp
texture
© DR

Elma vases
texture
© DR

Goom seat
texture
© Fillioux&Fillioux

Octopuss standing lamp
technique
© DR

Black Honey cup
technique
© DR

Memory, coll. Soma light sculpture
texture
© DR

Quin suspension lamp
technique
© DR

Mia armchair
impression
© DR

K-bench
technique
© DR

Béa coffee table
impression
© DR

Squeeze standing lamp
technique
© Fillioux&Fillioux

Cordula
technique
© DR

Hole chair
impression
© DR

Sound System vase
technique
© DR

Phantom chair
technique
© DR

Vela chair
texture
© DR

Hommage à un boxeur déchu cupboard
technique
© Fillioux&Fillioux

© DR

© DR

© DR

© DR

© DR

Cork Family stools
texture
© DR

trunk El Baul
technique
© DR

Transatlantic chair & table
texture
© DR

Truffle seat
technique
© DR

One chair
technique
© DR

Osorom structure
technique
© DR

Prince armchair
technique
© DR

Surface Oroz screen
technique
© DR

Knotted Chair seat
texture
© DR

Egg speaker
technique
© DR

Carbon chair
technique
© DR

Set Up Shades standing lamp
texture
© DR

Crochet table
texture
© DR

Flower table
impression
© DR

X3 chair
technique
© DR

Chromatique chair
impression
© J. Bello

Iseeme table
impression
© J. Bello

Fergus table
texture
© DR

Lui armchair
impression
© M. Renoma

Bonboniere plate
technique
© DR

Bicicleta rug
texture
© DR

Romance pedestal
technique
© DR

Flexible screen
texture
© Fillioux&Fillioux

Damasco coffee table
impression
© DR

Lens table
impression
© DR

Caboche suspension lamp
textrure
© DR

Solid C2 chair
technique
© DR

Rainbow chair
texture
© DR

Bigoli suspension lamp
texture
© DR

Louis Ghost armchair
impression
© DR

Mademoiselle armchair
impression
© DR

Couture chair
impression
© DR

Outline miror
impression
© DR

172B suspension lamp
technique
© DR

Dora armchair
technique
© DR

Mist armchair
texture
© DR

Algues room divider
technique
© DR

Twig room divider
technique
© DR

Barroco container
texture
© DR

© DR

© DR

© DR

© DR

© DR

© DR

© DR

© DR

© DR

© DR

Mid Summer Light lamp shade
technique
© DR

Rialto Deco coffee table
impression
© DR

© DR

© DR

© DR

© DR

Pop'Up Punch seat
impression
© DR

Top